News

(Created page with "== <u><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: trebuchet ms,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(128, 0, 128);"><small>Find breaking news about latest ...")
 
Line 3: Line 3:
 
<u><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: trebuchet ms,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(128, 0, 128);"><small></small></span></span></span></u>&nbsp;
 
<u><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: trebuchet ms,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(128, 0, 128);"><small></small></span></span></span></u>&nbsp;
  
*
+
*[
  
 
<span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: tahoma,geneva,sans-serif;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Most current approaches to Alzheimer's disease focus on the accumulation of amyloid plaque in the brain. The researchers at the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, led by Adam M. Brickman, PhD, assistant professor of neuropsychology, examined the additional contribution of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease, which they visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs).</span></span>
 
<span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: tahoma,geneva,sans-serif;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Most current approaches to Alzheimer's disease focus on the accumulation of amyloid plaque in the brain. The researchers at the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, led by Adam M. Brickman, PhD, assistant professor of neuropsychology, examined the additional contribution of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease, which they visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs).</span></span>

Revision as of 10:56, 5 March 2013

Find breaking news about latest dementia research, articles, post a topic to discuss

 

  • [

             Most current approaches to Alzheimer's disease focus on the accumulation of amyloid plaque in the brain. The researchers at the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, led by Adam M. Brickman, PhD, assistant professor of neuropsychology, examined the additional contribution of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease, which they visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs).

Data2a-e1307568911229-720x553.jpg

  

              Natural chemicals found in green tea and red wine may disrupt a key step of the Alzheimer's disease pathway, according to new research from the University of Leeds.

             green_tea_pot.png